ACCRA Cost of Living Index

The Council for Community and Economic Research (C2ER) produces the ACCRA Cost of Living Index to provide a useful and reasonably accurate measure of living cost differences among urban areas.  The ACCRA Cost of Living Index measures relative price levels for consumer goods and services in participating areas. The average for all participating places, both metropolitan and nonmetropolitan, equals 100, and each participant’s index is read as a percentage of the average for all places.  The Index does not measure inflation (price change over time). Because each quarterly report is a separate comparison of prices at a single point in time, and because both the number and the mix of participants changes from one quarter to the next, Index data from different quarters cannot be compared.

Consumer Price Index (CPI)

A measure of inflation established by the average change in prices over time in a market basket of goods and services, as calculated by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Education

Educational Attainment

The highest level of schooling completed by a population age 25 years and over by census geographic boundaries and grade from the U.S. Census Bureau decennial censuses and American Community Survey.

School Enrollment

(High school and below) is available by individual school district and grade as reported to the State Departments of Education from individual school districts or by census geographic boundaries and grade from the U.S. Census Bureau decennial censuses and American Community Survey.  Post-secondary school enrollment is collected from individual institutions.  Definitions of enrollment and methodologies for acquiring yearly totals may vary by institution.   Within the Greater Quad Cities Region there are two community college districts, a 4-year private liberal arts college, a private university, a public university (Western Illinois University affiliate campus), and a college of chiropractic.  In addition to the above, there is the Quad Cities Graduate Center, which is a publicly funded academic consortium of 10 colleges and universities.

Greater Quad Cities Region

The five county area served by the Bi-State Regional Commission, including Henry, Mercer and Rock Island Counties, Illinois and Muscatine and Scott Counties, Iowa.

Income

Per Capita Personal Income

Total personal income (TPI) is defined as the income that is received by persons from participation in production, government, business transfer payments, and government interest.  The personal income of an area is the income that is received by, or on behalf of, all the individuals who live in the area; therefore, the estimates of personal income are presented by the place of residence of the income recipients.  Per capita personal income (PCPI) is calculated as the TPI of the residents of an area divided by the population of that area.  This data is provided by the U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis.  Household income is number of households in a  geography within defined income ranges and is provided by the U.S. Census Bureau.  Median household income is the average income of all households in a  geography, such as a city or county and is also provided by the U.S. Census Bureau .

Labor Force

All civilian, non-institutionalized persons who are 16 years of age or older and are considered either employed or unemployed.  Some persons, such as retirees, students and homemakers, are not considered part of the labor force because they are not actively seeking employment, nor would they accept employment if it were offered.  Labor force is only available for selected cities in the Greater Quad Cities Region and larger geographies.

Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA)

A Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) is a geographic entity defined by the federal Office of Management and Budget for use by federal statistical agencies, based on the concept of a core area with a large population nucleus, plus adjacent communities having a high degree of economic and social integration with that core.  The MSA in the Greater Quad Cities Region is officially titled Davenport-Rock Island-Moline, IA-IL Metropolitan Statistical Area.  For the past several decades the federally set MSA boundary for the Quad Cities area included all of Henry and Rock Island Counties in Illinois; and all of Scott County in Iowa.  In the summer of 2003, the Office of Management and Budget added Mercer County, Illinois to the Davenport-Rock Island-Moline, IA-IL MSA. This change occurred after the 2000 Census and is not reflected in Census 2000 data.

However, some data sets compiled for the GreaterQCRegion.org website reflect statistics for the revised (2003) MSA. Please see the Special Note section for each data set (under its source citation).

Poverty

The U.S. Census Bureau uses a set of income thresholds that vary by family size and composition to determine who is considered in poverty.  If a family’s total income is less than the set threshold(s), then that family, and every individual in it, is considered impoverished.  The poverty thresholds do not vary geographically.

Real Estate Activity

Information on real estate activity in the Greater Quad Cities Region is courtesy of Ruhl & Ruhl Realtors, supplied by REALTOR Associations from Multiple Listing Service (MLS).  It is compiled for geographic areas such as a city or cities and their surrounding areas.  These geographic areas do not necessarily match Census-defined geographic boundaries, so care should be taken when comparing this data with Census data.

Unemployment

All civilians 16 years old and over are classified as unemployed if they (1) were neither “at work” nor “with a job but not at work” during the reference week, (2) were actively looking for work during the last four weeks, and (3) were available to accept a job.  Also included as unemployed are civilians who did not work at all during the reference week, were waiting to be called back to a job from which they had been laid off, and were available for work except for temporary illness.  Unemployment is only available for selected cities in the Greater Quad Cities Region and larger geographies.

U.S. Census

Decennial Census

The official U.S. Census is described in Article I, Section 2 of the Constitution of the United States. It calls for an actual enumeration of the people every ten years, to be used for apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives among the states. The first official Census was conducted in 1790 and decennial Censuses have been conducted every ten years, generally on April 1 in years ending in a zero.

Besides providing the basis for congressional redistricting, Census data are used in many other ways. Since 1975, the Census Bureau has had responsibility to produce small-area population data needed to redraw state legislative and congressional districts. Other important uses of Census data include the distribution of funds for government programs such as Medicaid; planning the right locations for schools, roads, and other public facilities; helping real estate agents and potential residents learn about a neighborhood; and identifying trends over time that can help predict future needs. Most Census data are available for many levels of geography, including states, counties, cities and towns, ZIP codes, census tracts and blocks, and much more.

With the 2010 Census there are no longer two forms for the decennial census , the “short form” and the “long form.”  The long form has been replaced by the American Community Survey, an annual surveyed sample of persons and housing units (generally sent to 1 in 6 households) with detailed questions pertaining to population and housing characteristics.  The short form is a 100-percent count with a limited number of questions asked of every person and housing unit in the United States. Information is available on age, Hispanic or Latino origin, household relationship, race, sex, tenure (whether the home is owned or rented), and vacancy characteristics.

American Community Survey (ACS)

The American Community Survey (ACS) is a new nationwide survey designed to provide communities a fresh look at how they are changing. It is a critical element in the Census Bureau's reengineered decennial census program.  The American Community Survey replaces the “long form” used in the decennial censuses prior to Census 2010.  The ACS collects information such as age, race, income, commute time to work, home value, veteran status, and other important data. As with the 2010 decennial census, information about individuals will remain confidential.

The ACS collects and produces population and housing information every year instead of every ten years. Collecting data every year provides more up-to-date information throughout the decade about the U.S. population at the local community level. About three million housing unit addresses are selected annually, from across every county in the nation.

Single-Year Estimates

Beginning with the 2005 ACS, and continuing every year thereafter, 1-year estimates are available annually for geographic areas with a population of 65,000 or more. This includes the nation, all states and the District of Columbia, all congressional districts, approximately 800 counties, and 500 metropolitan and micropolitan statistical areas, among others.

Multi-Year Estimates

In 2008, the Census Bureau released its first 3-year estimates based on ACS data collected from 2005 through 2007. These 3-year estimates are available annually for geographic areas with a population of 20,000 or more, including the nation, all states and the District of Columbia, all congressional districts, approximately 1,800 counties, and 900 metropolitan and micropolitan statistical areas, among others.  New 3-year estimates are release each year.

For areas with a population less than 20,000, 5-year estimates became available in 2010 for virtually all geographic areas. The estimates are based on ACS data collected from 2005 through 2009.  This is the ACS data set provided on GreaterQCRegion.org website noted with the Data Year label “2005 – 2009.”

NOTE:  Some geographic areas cannot be displayed because the number of sample cases is too small.

Census Base Data

Original published data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s Decennial Census.  These data sets do not include changes from the Count Question Resolution (CQR) Program or other post Census boundary changes.

Census Count Question Resolution (CQR) Program

The Census Bureau established the 2010 Census Count Question Resolution (CQR) Program by which State, local and Tribal area elected officials may challenge their jurisdiction's 2010 Census counts. On June 1, 2011, the Count Question Resolution (CQR) Program began accepting 2010 Census challenge submissions. All challenges must be received by the Census Bureau no later than June 1, 2013.

The U.S. Census Bureau partnered with state, local and tribal governments across the nation to help ensure a complete and accurate count in the 2010 Census. The Census Bureau's goal was to count everyone once, only once, and in the right place. There are historically a small percentage of cases where a wrong geographic boundary or coding of a housing unit was used to produce the official census population and housing counts for a local area. There may also be processing errors. The Census Bureau will not collect any additional data during the challenge process.

The 2010 CQR Program is not a mechanism or process to challenge or revise the population counts sent to the President by December 31, 2010, which are used to apportion the U.S. House of Representatives. The Census Bureau will not make any changes to the apportionment, redistricting counts, or official 2010 Census data products. 

Three types of challenges will be accepted by the CQR program:

Boundary Challenges - Correct inaccurate reporting or recording of boundaries legally in effect on January 1, 2010.

Geocoding Challenges - Correct the placement of living quarters and associated population within the correct governmental unit boundaries and 2010 census tabulation blocks.

Coverage Challenges - Add or delete specific living quarters and people associated with them, identified during the census process, but erroneously included as duplicates or excluded due to processing errors.

If a challenge results in a change, the Census Bureau will issue official revised counts to the affected governments. These changes can be used by the governments for future programs that require official 2010 Census data. They will also be used to calculate subsequent population estimates for that community.

The Count Question Resolution Program was also available for Censuses 2000 and 1990. 

Geographies in the Greater Quad Cities Region with Corrected Counts as a result of the CQR program are as follows:

Census 2000 – Rock Island County, Illinois and Scott County, Iowa; as well as the following municipalities in Illinois:  Cordova, Coyne Center CDP (Census Designated Place), East Moline, Oak Grove; and in Iowa:  Atalissa, Bettendorf, LeClaire, Panorama Park, and Riverdale.  Corrected Counts were also released for the States of Illinois and Iowa, as well as the United States.  In addition, totals for the Davenport-Rock Island-Moline, IA-IL Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) and Greater Quad Cities Region have been recalculated, but are unofficial Census Counts.

Census 1990 – In the Illinois Greater Quad Cities Region:  Coal Valley, Milan, Moline, and Rock Island; and in Iowa:  Scott County; as well as the following municipalities:  Bettendorf, Buffalo, Davenport, Dixon, Princeton, and Riverdale.  In addition, totals for the Davenport-Rock Island-Moline, IA-IL Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) and Greater Quad Cities Region have been recalculated, but are unofficial Census Counts.

For more information on the Census 2010 Count Question Resolution (CQR) Program, visit http://2010.census.gov/2010census/about/cqr.php.

For more information on the Census 2000 Count Question Resolution (CQR) Program, visit http://www.census.gov/dmd/www/CQR.htm.

Special Census

A Special Census is a basic enumeration of population, housing units, and group quarters conducted by the Census Bureau at the request of a governmental unit. They are conducted on a cost-reimbursable basis. The Census Bureau's authority to conduct Special Censuses is specified in Title 13, United States Code, Section 196.

Following Census 2000, one community in the Greater Quad Cities Region, Eldridge, Iowa conducted a Special Census on July 1, 2004.  Those counts are reflected on the GreaterQCRegion.org website in the data set called “Total Population – Corrected Counts.”

Bi-State Regional Commission Census Data Policy

A policy administered to address issues of which data should be utilized/cited when both base data and Count Question Resolution (CQR) Program data are available for a given geography.  Bi-State Regional Commission will attempt to issue corrected census counts for geographies in the Bi-State Region, for which these numbers are applicable.  Otherwise, Bi-State Regional Commission will issue census base data.  Totals for geographies larger than counties use base data, unless otherwise noted.

U.S. Census Bureau Population Estimates Program

The Population Estimates Program publishes total resident population estimates and demographic components of change (births, deaths, and migration) each year.  The Census Bureau also publishes the estimates by demographic characteristics (age, sex, race, and Hispanic origin) for the nation, states, and counties.  The reference date for estimates is July 1.  Estimates usually are for the present and the past, while projections are estimates of the population for future dates.  These estimates are used in federal funding allocations, as denominators for vital rates and per capita time series, as survey controls, and in monitoring recent demographic changes. With each new issue of July 1 estimates, the Census Bureau revises estimates for years back to the last census. Previously published estimates are superseded and archived.